A global leader in remote patient monitoring software and cardiac data management solutions, Implicity, has announced it is expanding its line of products and services to include a dedicated solution for managing heart failure. A new AI-based tool was developed in collaboration with Withings — one of the leading providers of remotely monitored health products.

Dr. Arnaud Rosier, cardiologist, and CEO of Implicity said, “Weight gain is one of the earliest clinical signs that indicate a patient’s condition with heart failure may be getting worse: patients can gain up to ten pounds due to fluid retention and edema when they decompensate. Using our solution in combination with innovative smart devices, like the Withings scale, care teams now know when these symptoms first develop so that doctors can be proactive and provide early treatment to avoid hospitalization or ultimately death.”

With Implicity’s universal platform, not only can cardiac implantable electronic devices (CIEDs) be integrated seamlessly, but data gathered via Withings devices, such as smart scales, can also be easily accessed. The Implicity heart failure solution automatically alerts medical care teams whenever a patient undergoing remote monitoring for heart failure experiences an unexpected weight gain or missing weight data.

Over a dozen French medical centers are already using Implicity’s heart failure solution. The company recently entered into a commercial agreement with Bayer HealthCare SAS France in order to accelerate the adoption of its technology.

Guilhem Maffre-Bauge, Director of Business Unit General practice, Bayer Pharmaceuticals France, said, “Comprehensive management includes treatment, prevention, and prediction. Implicity’s solution is part of this approach. This is a very promising medical technology company with concrete research and development projects and solid data and AI expertise. We are delighted with this collaboration and to be able to contribute together to accelerate the adoption of heart failure telemonitoring in France.”

In the United States alone, approximately 5.7 million people suffer from heart failure, the leading cause of death in the world. Additionally, it is the leading cause of hospitalization for people over the age of 65. A remote monitoring system for heart failure patients reduces avoidable hospitalizations, improves the quality of life of fragile patients, and strengthens patient compliance.